iTunes - Podcast RSS Feed - Podcast RSS Feed - News RPGFan YouTube Channel RPGFan on Facebook RPGFan on Twitter


RPGFan Social Links
Thousand Arms Soundtrack & Multimedia CD
Catalog Number: N/A
Released On: October 14, 1999
Composed By: Atlus Sound Team, Ayumi Hamasaki (1-2)
Arranged By: N/A
Published By: Atlus
Recorded At: Unknown
Format: 1 CD
Tracklist:

01 - Depend on You
02 - Two of Us
03 - Her Smile
04 - Hold it Right There, DUDE
05 - Burning Calypso
06 - The Soul Samurai
07 - The Fake Rondo
08 - The Dress Master
09 - Depend on You (Remix)
10 - Love Mania
11 - Black Night
12 - Jeala, the Theme of Love
13 - The Evil Mecha-5
14 - The King of Pirates
15 - The Eternal Melody
16 - Lucky Pyon
17 - The Gadget MIX
18 - The Eve of Destruction
19 - Wish
20 - The Ancient Land
21 - Anxiety
22 - The Foreign Master
23 - The Ancient Breath
24 - Battle 1
25 - Seaside Samba
26 - Beginning of the Journey
27 - My Homeland
28 - Peaceful Days
29 - The Defense Fortress
30 - Friends
31 - Departure
32 - The New Continent
33 - The Station
34 - The Railroad Song
35 - El Dorado
36 - Horror World
37 - The Spirit Woods
38 - Gothic Roman
39 - The Happy Ghost Gang
40 - Haunted House
Total Time:
54'23"

When I got Thousand Arms, there was no doubt in my mind that I would send in that card and the $2 for postage/handling for the soundtrack/multimedia CD. I had seen the intro movie on RPGfan before the game came out, and I fell in love with Ayumi Hamasaki's "Depend on You," the song that kicks off the game and the CD. And while the rest of Atlus's soundtrack doesn't match up to Hamasaki-san's strong opening, the music is terrific in its own right. The vibe I got from the game was "an unabashed sense of cartoony fun." This unabashed sense of cartoony fun would not have been present without this bubbly soundtrack.

The CD has 40 tracks, which is by no means a complete soundtrack, and each track only plays to completion one time. I lament that my favorite piece of music in the game wasn't on here. Said piece of music is the one that plays during Thousand Arms' mini-games.

However, the recording was done in Redbook, I believe, so many of the songs have greater clarity than in the game and one can hear the more subtle nuances in the compositions. Track 24 ("Battle 1") is a good example of this. On the CD, I could hear the bassline quite clearly and the electric guitar of the main melody also had greater clarity. I could hear effects like reverb that I couldn't hear during battles in the game itself.

After Ayumi Hamasaki's contributions, the character themes start off the soundtrack. I always favored soundtracks with character themes, and this one's no exception. Each character theme fits the respective character perfectly. "Hold it Right There, DUDE" for example fits Muza perfectly. It's heroic sounding, Muza being a soldier and all, but it doesn't take itself too seriously given that Muza is a rather comical character. My favorite character theme is "The Dress Master" (Nelsha's theme) with its playful melody and use of whistles.

As one can easily tell, my favorite pieces were the comical ones. Track 17 ("The Gadget MIX") never ceases to make me chuckle. And Track 28 ("Peaceful Days") with its jaunty hook and multilayered instrumentation quickly became a favorite town theme. Sure there are slightly darker or more emotional themes such as Track 19 ("Wish") or Track 21 ("Anxiety"), but even then it's more in that cartoony melodrama. No matter what, the unabashed sense of fun pervades the soundtrack and I feel like it never takes itself too seriously.

I also really like the diversity of the soundtrack. Tracks like "The Station" (Track 33) have an exaggerated country-Western vibe, with layered instrumentation and a lot of twangy 'wah' sounds while others like Track 20 ("The Ancient Land) emply different styles. "The Ancient Land" has a very pretty blend of a simple piano melody with some synth in the background to add sparkle. Again, like in the rest of the game, the musical styles are often exaggerated in a cartoony way.

Along with the soundtrack, the CD is crammed with lots of cool stuff for your computer. There's wallpapers, a desktop theme, links to various sites (such as RPGfan) and some WAV files. But the real fun comes if you right-click the CD drive icon in the "My Computer" folder where you have access to a multitude of WAV files, many of which are outtakes. Some of the outtakes are absolutely hilarious.

All in all, I'd say this CD was well worth the $2. I got more than I bargained for. While I could lament the lack of my favorite music pieces (like the aforementioned mini-game music or the boss battle themes), I shall not because the positives outweigh the negatives here. While Thousand Arms' soundtrack doesn't have the majesty of, say, Yasunori Mitsuda's Xenogears soundtrack, it does have that...say it with me...unabashed sense of fun from such comedic anime soundtracks like those in Ranma . I enjoy listening to this soundtrack and I listen to it whenever I'm in one of my more lighthearted or silly moods, which is fairly often.

Reviewed by: Neal Chandran

As an extra incentive to buy Thousand Arms, Atlus enclosed a special CD offer with the game. More than just a music CD, the disc also came with Thousand Arms-themed software for your PC.

The Thousand Arms Soundtrack and Multimedia CD has total of 40 tracks. The CD does not contain a complete soundtrack, as not every song from Thousand Arms is present on the disc, but a lot of the game's great music is there. Most tracks are only between 30 and 60 seconds long; just enough time to play the entire song once. The music on the CD isn't exactly the same as the music heard while playing the game; some songs were re-arranged and given small enhancements for the CD.

The music from Thousand Arms begins with the opening and ending songs "Depend on You" and "Two of Us", both of which are sung by acclaimed Japanese pop singer Ayumi Hamasaki. I must say that the thing that initially drew me to Thousand Arms was hearing "Depend on You" on the Thousand Arms Demo Disc. The music in Thousand Arms is very fitting to the scenery and gameplay. The CD includes some of the dark and mysterious music from places like dungeons and caves as well as the relaxing music from the towns. There is also a great deal of peppy, upbeat, and even silly music for battles and fun events. Songs like these fit very well into Thousand Arms, as I consider it one of the most hilarious games I've ever played.

Also included on the CD are some things for your PC. The first is a desktop theme, which includes weapon shaped mouse pointers, voice samples from Thousand Arms for sound effects, Thousand Arms artwork for icons, wallpaper and screen savers, and pastel colors for windows. Next, there is a cast screen, with images, descriptions, theme songs, and voice samples of most of the major characters from Thousand Arms. There is also a screen with links to many great gaming web sites like The GIA, Videogames.com, PlayStation Interactive, and of course, RPGFan! Finally, the software has about 100 .wav files containing out takes from the voice recording sessions. Included in these out takes is a special MP3 called the "Kyleen Mix", which has many of Kyleen's famous lines combined with a quirky piece of music. The "Kyleen Mix" is very funny and quite entertaining.

The Thousand Arms Soundtrack and Multimedia CD can be acquired for a mere $2 shipping charge along with the purchase of the game. If you buy Thousand Arms, by all means, send away for this CD. It's dirt cheap and very enjoyable.

Reviewed by: Musashi



Back




Featured Content
Shadowrun: Dragonfall - Director's Cut Review
Shadowrun: Dragonfall - Director's Cut
Review
The Book of Unwritten Tales 2 Hands-On Preview
The Book of Unwritten Tales 2
Hands-On Preview
Costume Quest 2 Review
Costume Quest 2
Review
Rogue Wizards Hands-On Preview
Rogue Wizards
Hands-On Preview
Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward First Look
Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward
Details, Trailer
Steins;Gate Review
Steins;Gate
Review
Gabriel Knight 20th Anniversary Edition Review
Gabriel Knight 20th Anniversary Edition
Review