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Suite Wizardry II ~ Legacy of Llylgamyn
Catalog Number: BY30-5209
Released On: March 5, 1989
Composed By: Kentaro Haneda
Arranged By: Kentaro Haneda
Published By: Apollon
Recorded At: Apollon Recording Studio
Format: 1 CD
Tracklist:

Synthersizer Orchestra Version
01 - Opening Theme
02 - Legacy of Llylgamyn
03 - Gilgamesh's Tavern Second Scene
04 - Boltac's Trading Post Corner
05 - Edge of Town II
06 - Dungeon's Theme II
07 - All Is Dead ~Requiem~
08 - Temple of Cant Second Scene
09 - Camp Field
10 - Fighting Sights
11 - Rest of Adventurer's Inn
12 - L'Kbreth
13 - Ending Theme
Original Version
14 - Legacy of Llylgamyn / Game Original Sound Story
Sound Effect Collection
15 - A
16 - B
17 - C
18 - D
19 - E
20 - F
21 - TRAP (Poison Needle)
22 - TRAP (Gas Bomb)
23 - TRAP (Crossbow Bolt)
24 - TRAP (Exploding Box)
25 - TRAP (Stunner)
26 - TRAP (Teleporter)
27 - TRAP (Mage Blaster)
28 - TRAP (Priest Blaster)
29 - TRAP (Alarm)
Total Time:
56'04"

Haneda, after producing a decent score for the original Japanese version of Wizardry, returned for the sequel. He would do so again for many sequels after this as well. However, as is the case with the initial sequels of many a franchise, this one is mighty weak.

The style is very much the same as the first. The use of a synthesized orchestra for arrangement is again present, and the "classical" tonal patterns are all accounted for. But the best of the melodies appear as reprises from the first album. I appreciate, on a technical level, the interesting twists and new themes Haneda attempts in sequel-songs such as Gilgamesh's Tavern or Edge of Town, but I found them inferior to their original counterparts.

Two positives I found, particularly in relation to "We Love Wizardry." The first is the lack of bland atmospheric pieces. The new Dungeon Theme is decent, and no one song left me wondering how my mind had completely missed the defining melody. Each song is distinct, and that's a plus in my book. The second positive is the inclusion of original audio. As much as I love a good arranged album, the inclusion of the original sound, from the glory days of the Famicom, made me a much happier man. The short little sound effect blips are an okay bonus too, I guess.

All in all, this album was one of Haneda's weaker contributions to the Wizardry series. Relative to the grand scheme of VGM, it weighs in a little higher than the "average" album. It is easily one of the most obscure albums in the series, but even if you were to come across it, only diehard fans should be interested.

Reviewed by: Patrick Gann



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